Pirates Cut Hand off Hostage

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Pirates Cut Hand off Hostage

مُساهمة من طرف احمد محمد احمد في الأربعاء 25 يناير 2012, 18:30


منقول من gCaptain.com


http://gcaptain.com/pirate-tactics-turn-gruesome/?38294&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Gcaptain+%28gCaptain.com%29

By gCaptain Staff On January 24, 2012 ....


- By JD, Somalia Report

Pirates Cut Hand off Hostage to Force $3M Ransom

Somali pirates holding the crew of the hijacked Taiwanese flagged FV Shiuh Fu No 1 shifted to a new and graphic tactic to push owners to pay ransom. Pirates and other local sources informed Somalia Report that they had cut the hand off the captain of the ship . This marks a significant turn in the way pirates manage hostages and the first noted instance of forced amputation by Somali pirates in recent years.

After the owner refused to pay the demanded $3 million ransom, pirates amputated the hand of Chao-I Wu, the captain of the vessel, according to pirates and the hostages’ family members.

“Ever since pirates hijacked this vessel, negotiations about releasing the vessel and hostages were ongoing. In fact, more than twice the negotiations were stalled. Months later the negotiations restarted and the pirates finally demanded $3 million in ransom. The owner refused to pay, causing a direct conflict between pirates, the owners and relatives of these hostages,” said the pirate.

The conflict forced the change in tactics, according to the pirate.

“After weeks of discussions and failure to come to an agreement, the pirates finally decided to cut off the right hand of captain of the vessel. His name is Chao-I Wu. They also beat the deputy captain,” he added.


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رد: Pirates Cut Hand off Hostage

مُساهمة من طرف Admin في الخميس 26 يناير 2012, 02:01

لعنة الله تغشاهم
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Sudanese authorities have rescued 35 Egyptian fishermen

مُساهمة من طرف عاطف عكود في الجمعة 27 يناير 2012, 02:27

Thirty-five Egyptian fishermen rescued from sinking boat
Sudanese authorities have rescued 35 Egyptian fishermen who were on board two ships that sunk off the coast of Sudan, Egypt’s Foreign Ministry said on Monday. The ministry’s spokesperson, Amr Roshdy, said the Egyptian Embassy in Sudan followed up developments throughout the last 24 hours in coordination with Sudanese authorities. He said 33 of the fishermen, who were taken to hospital, were in good condition, while the two others were severely exhausted.
Roshdy assured that the embassy will return the fishermen home once their health conditions improve. He praised Sudan’s efforts to save the sailors’ lives and care for them in the hospital
.

عاطف عكود

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ISPS Code......

مُساهمة من طرف ود فـــــراج في الجمعة 27 يناير 2012, 13:47

Dear Gents
Capt. Ahmed,
Capt. Atif

Hi, I wish you are in good health, and good condition.............


The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code is an amendment to the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention (1974/1988) on minimum security arrangements for ships, ports and government agencies. Having come into force in 2004, it prescribes responsibilities to governments, shipping companies, shipboard personnel, and port/facility personnel to "detect security threats and take preventative measures against security incidents affecting ships or port facilities used in international trade.

History
The IMO states that "The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) is a comprehensive set of measures to enhance the security of ships and port facilities, developed in response to the perceived threats to ships and port facilities in the wake of the 9/11 attacks in the United States" (IMO).
Development and implementation were sped up drastically in reaction to the September 11, 2001 attacks and the bombing of the French oil tanker Limburg. The U.S. Coast Guard, as the lead agency in the United States delegation to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), advocated for the measure.[2] The Code was agreed at a meeting of the 108 signatories to the SOLAS convention in London in December 2002. The measures agreed under the Code were brought into force on July 1, 2004.
Scope
The ISPS Code is implemented through chapter XI-2 Special measures to enhance maritime security in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).
The Code is a two-part document describing minimum requirements for security of ships and ports. Part A provides mandatory requirements. Part B provides guidance for implementation.
The ISPS Code applies to ships on international voyages (including passenger ships, cargo ships of 500 GT and upwards, and mobile offshore drilling units) and the port facilities serving such ships.
The main objectives of the ISPS Code are:
• To detect security threats and implement security measures
• To establish roles and responsibilities concerning maritime security for governments, local administrations, ship and port industries at the national and international level
• To collate and promulgate security-related information
• To provide a methodology for security assessments so as to have in place plans and procedures to react to changing security levels
Requirements
The Code does not specify specific measures that each port and ship must take to ensure the safety of the facility against terrorism because of the many different types and sizes of these facilities. Instead it outlines "a standardized, consistent framework for evaluating risk, enabling governments to offset changes in threat with changes in vulnerability for ships and port facilities."
For ships the framework includes requirements for:
• Ship security plans
• Ship security officers
• Company security officers
• Certain onboard equipment
For port facilities, the requirements include:
• Port facility security plans
• Port facility security officers
• Certain security equipment
In addition the requirements for ships and for port facilities include:
• Monitoring and controlling access
• Monitoring the activities of people and cargo
• Ensuring security communications are readily available
[justify]


[right]بالرغـم من كل ذلك لم يجدي فتيلا في حمـاية الطـاقم من شر القرصـنة الصومـالية......ولنا عودة لمناقشة الأمر إذا أذن الله....فـائق الإحترام والتقديـر لكـم

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